Friday, July 6, 2007

Charismatic Gifts

Late in June I posted an article on Baptists and Tongues. That post generated a decent amount of comments - yes, seven comments is a fair amount for one of my blogs, and I have no problem counting the spam comment and my reply to it! Considering the discussion that post created, I am pleased to provide you, dear reader, with a link to the most recent Pyromaniacs post - Cessationism Again.

Phil and his
merry blogging band have repeatedly posted on this issue, so you will be able to find supplemental information and discussion on this topic if you nose around the Team Pyro site.

Just be careful and don't burn yourself!



2 comments:

Fresh Dirt said...

Travis, why do you hold so strongly to cessationism? I would ask the same thing of a continualist. Both positions seem very hard to "prove" yet you mentioned that you would part ecclesial fellowship with a church believing in a continualist position. I myself would not place myself in either category because both views seem to grab a bible verse here and two or three from there. It is very clear from the Pauline letters that spiritual gifts existed. It is not clear in scripture that they ceased. Nevertheless, the use of some of these gifts seem to decline in use by the 3rd century, plus the fact that the rest of the NT, especially the gospels lack any concept of them gives me the thought that they are not very important in the whole scheme of things. Just some challenging thoughts to chew on.

Travis said...

Justin,
I apologize for the lull between your comment and my response. My belated reply is as follows. I do not think it hard to "prove" the cessationist position. I believe that 1 Corinthians 13:8-12 provides strong evidence for the cessation - not of all spiritual gifts - but of the supernatural sign gifts. Paul contrasts the constancy of love with the ephemerality of some spiritual gifts; namely "prophecies, tongues, and knowledge". He said that when the perfect is come the partial will end. I belive the "perfect" is neither a reference to Christ nor His Second Coming. I believe it is a reference to the finished New Testament. The completed scriptures are a "more sure word of prophecy" according to Peter, who saw the transfigured Christ speaking with the glorified Moses and Elijah. In spite of that overwheliming experience, he declared that Scripture is the ultimate and final authority.

That is why I would ecclesiastically separate over this issue. I cannot in good conscience coordinate and/or cooperate in missionary endeavors with a church that holds ecstatic experiences on the same level, or maybe even higher, than the "more sure word of prophecy".